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Collector's Choice

 

Oklaoma Proven! logo.jpgOklahoma Proven is a plant promotion program coordinated by faculty in the Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture at Oklahoma State University. The goal of the program is to recommend plants well-adapted for use across Oklahoma.

 

 


Collector's Choice for 2017

Jujube or Chinese Date

Ziziphus jujuba

Jujube, also known as Chinese date is an excellent small to medium sized tree with shiny green foliage in summer and yellow leaves in fall. The naturally drooping tree is graceful, ornamental and often thorny with branches growing in a zig-zag pattern. Jujube can grow to about 15 to 30 feet high. It makes a great landscape tree with the added benefit of edible fruits. Commonly grown cultivars include ‘Li’ and ‘Lang’. Fruit are round to elongate and mature from green to red, when they have a sweet, crisp flesh somewhat similar to an apple. After maturing to red/reddish brown, the fruits wrinkle and take on the appearance of a date.

  • Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • Soil: Prefers moist, well-drained, acid soil, but is adaptable
  • Hardiness: USDA Zone 4-9




2017 Ziziphus jujuba

 

 

Collector's Choice for 2016

Deciduous Cultivars

Magnolia

Deciduous forms of magnolia are spectacular additions to any spring landscape. Among the most popular of deciduous forms are star magnolia (M. stellata) and saucer magnolia (M. x soulangiana), but several others are available along with their many hybrids, which provide a wide variety of flower colors from red to white, yellow, pink, or purple. The most common color available is pink, but others should be tried such as ‘Elizabeth’, an older selection with creamy yellow flowers, or ‘Butterflies’, a newer selection with deep yellow flowers. Flowers of deciduous magnolias appear just before or while the leaves are emerging in spring. Early flowering varieties can be damaged by late frosts; avoid placing plants in a southern exposure where flowers will open early. Deciduous magnolias can range in size from small to medium shrubs to large trees. 
  • Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • Soil: Prefers moist, well-drained, acid soil, but is adaptable
  • Hardiness: USDA Zone 4-9


 

 

Collector's Choice for 2015

Black Gum (new improved cultivars)

Nyssa sylvatica

Black gum is an eastern native growing slowly to 50’ to 60’ or more. They are picturesque shade trees with beautiful summer foliage and gorgeous fall color. New selections of black gum are more resistant to leaf spot, which can occasionally be a problem, and have excellent form. Wildfire (N. sylvatica ‘Wildfire’) grows slowly to 60’ high by 25’ wide. New growth of Wildfire emerges red; leaves mature to a shiny dark green; and fall color is bright red. Fire Master™ (Nyssa sylvatica 'PRP1') grows about 50’ to 60’ tall and 25’ wide with a strong central leader; leaves turn a crimson red fall color. Red Rage™ (N. sylvatica ‘Hayman Red’) exhibits more leaf spot resistance than other cultivars and appears to be slightly smaller, growing 30’ to 50’ tall. Flowers of black gum are insignificant, but an important nectar source for bees and pollinators. The small, black fruits that follow are loved by birds. Black gums are an excellent tree for urban and street plantings and their neat habit requires little to no pruning to maintain their excellent shape.

  • Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • Soil: Prefers moist, well-drained, acid soil, but is adaptable
  • Hardiness: USDA Zone 4-9

 


Collector's Choice for 2014

Seven-son-flower

Heptacodium miconioides

Seven-son-flower is an upright, irregular, loose and open shrub growing 15 to 20’ high. Leaves appear early spring soft green maturing to dark green; very attractive and pest free. Flower buds form in early summer, but do not open until September. Individual flowers are tiny, but fragrant and attract butterflies to the garden. Sepals persist and change green to rose-purple and are as attractive as the flowers. Bark is exfoliating, whitish, to rich brown and green.

Seven-son-flower grows best in moist, well-drained, acid soil, but seems adaptable.

  • Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • Soil: Prefers moist, well-drained soil
  • Hardiness: USDA Zone 5-8

 

 

 

Collector's Choice for 2013

Specialty Fruit for Small Spaces

Miniature peaches, columnar apples, dwarf pomegranate, and dwarf patio type blueberries.

Many of the fruits we enjoy so much don’t fit well in today’s urban landscapes, especially the standard variety fruit trees. However, today’s breeding and production techniques bring us dwarf and miniature versions that fit in just about any space. Columnar apples, patio peaches, dwarf pomegranate and compact blueberries now make easy to enjoy fresh fruit right out our backdoors; and they are ornamental too!

  • Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • Soil: Prefers moist, well-drained soil; blueberries require acidic soil (pH5)
  • Hardiness: USDA Zone 3-11 (varies by species)

 

 


Collector's Choice for 2012

Sumac Collection
‘Bailtiger’ Tiger Eyes® and ‘Laciniata’

Rhus typhina

Sumacs are native to Oklahoma and these selections have unique characteristics. Tiger Eyes® is bright lime green to yellow all summer, turning brilliant bronzy red in fall. Tiger Eyes® can grow 6 to 7 feet high. Laciniata or laceleaf sumac has deeply divided leaflets that create a fine-textured, lacey appearance and turn shades of red, orange and yellow in fall. This cultivar can grow 10 to 15 feet tall. As with any other sumac they spread by suckers forming thickets. Fruit form in pyramidal clusters and are hairy red berry-like drupes that persist into winter providing interest and food for wildlife. Flowers that bloom in spring attract bees and butterflies. These selections of sumac are all great for naturalized areas and erosion control.

  • Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • Soil: Prefers moist, well-drained soil; tolerant of high pH soils and pollution
  • Hardiness: USDA Zone 3-7

 

 


Collector's Choice for 2011

Silver Linden

Tilia tomentosa

Silver linden is a beautiful large shade tree that can grow50’ to 70’ tall. It is quite tolerant of high pH soils and urban conditions and is more heat tolerant than other lindens making it a great street or shade tree for large yards in Oklahoma. Leaves of silver linden are dark green on the upper surface and silvery beneath, providing an interesting effect when the wind blows; leaves can have a nice yellow fall color. Tiny, fragrant, white, flowers attract bees in late June to July. Cultivars selected for brilliant fall color as well as outstanding performance are available.

  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil: Prefers moist, well-drained soil; tolerant of high pH soils and pollution
  • Hardiness: USDA Zone 4-7

 

 


Collector's Choice for 2010

Caddo Sugar Maple

Acer saccharum 'Caddo'

Caddo Sugar Maple is a native population of sugar maple found growing in Caddo County in southwestern Oklahoma. The leaves are dark green, deeply lobed and leathery making it more resistant to leaf tatter and scorch. Caddo Sugar Maple is also quite tolerant of high pH soils, extreme heat and drought conditions commonly found in western Oklahoma. It can reach 30’ to 50’ tall and is a beautiful medium to large shade tree. Fall color is variable, but can range from yellow to golden yellow to orange and sometimes red; cultivars selected for brilliant fall colors as well as outstanding performance are available.

  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil: Prefers well-drained
  • soil; tolerant of dry and high pH soils Hardiness: USDA Zone 5-9

 

 


Collector's Choice for 2009

Persian Parrotia

Parrotia persica

Persian Parrotia is a small tree reaching only 20 to 30’ tall and can spread almost as wide. Interesting deep-maroon flowers appear in late winter. Leaves have a reddish color when appearing in spring, change to a lustrous green in summer, and can be a brilliant yellow or orange in fall. As the tree ages the bark exfoliates into patches of green, cream, and gray adding to the year-round interest of this tree. It is very heat and drought tolerant once established but appreciates some protection from the afternoon sun.

  • Exposure: Light shade
  • Soil: Moist, well-drained
  • Hardiness: USDA Hardiness Zone 5